Getty Images Mike Piazza

With Mike Piazza's Hall of Fame induction coming this Sunday, we analyze the greatest athletes to ever put on a No. 31 jersey.

Mike Piazza
No. 31: Los Angeles Dodgers 1992-1998, New York Mets 1998-2005, Oakland Athletics 2007

Mike Piazza

After 427 home runs and a career .308 batting average, Piazza is known as one of the greatest hitting catchers to ever play the game. Piazza was recently elected to the baseball Hall of Fame, receiving 83% of the vote. The Mets will retire Piazza’s No. 31 during "Mike Piazza Weekend" at Citi Field, which will take place July 29-31.

Donnie Shell
No. 31: Pittsburgh Steelers 1974-1987

Donnie Shell

Despite going undrafted in the 1974 NFL Draft, Shell made five Pro Bowl appearances and won four Super Bowls as a safety for the Pittsburgh Steelers. While Shell is not in the Hall of Fame, he was an integral part of the famed Steel Curtain defense that terrified offenses in the 1970s.

Jamal Lewis
No. 31: Baltimore Ravens 2000-2006, Cleveland Browns 2007-2009

Jamal Lewis

After three strong seasons with the Tennessee Volunteers, Lewis started his NFL career in 2000. Three years later, Lewis rushed for the third-most yards in a single season, trailing only Eric Dickerson and Adrian Peterson. In ten years with the Ravens and Browns, Lewis racked up over 10,000 yards and 58 touchdowns.

Reggie Miller
No. 31: Indiana Pacers 1987-2005

Reggie Miller

While Miller did a lot to earn a spot in the NBA Hall of Fame, the Pacers legend is best known for his three-point shooting. Miller sits second in three-pointers made in NBA history, behind only Ray Allen. Miller was never able to win a championship with the Pacers, falling 4-2 to the Lakers in his one finals appearance in 2000.

Ferguson Jenkins
No. 31: Philadelphia Phillies 1965-1966, Chicago Cubs 1966-1973, 1982-1983, Texas Rangers 1974-1975, 1978-1981, Boston Red Sox 1976-1977

Ferguson Jenkins

The 1971 NL Cy Young Award winner racked up 284 wins in his 19-year career. He was the first Cubs pitcher to ever win the award. Beyond his success on the diamond, Jenkins played for the Harlem Globetrotters from 1967-1969.

Greg Maddux
No. 31: Chicago Cubs 1986-1992, 2004-2006, Atlanta Braves 1993-2003, Los Angeles Dodgers 2006, 2008, San Diego Padres 2007-2008

Greg Maddux

Maddux dominated hitters for nearly all of his 23-year career, but his most dominant stretch came from 1992-1995. In these four years, Maddux won four straight Cy Young Awards by posting a 75-29 record and sub 2.00 ERA. Maddux was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014 with 97.2 percent of the vote. The Cubs retired No. 31 for both Jenkins and Maddux in a dual-ceremony in 2009.

Billy Smith
No. 31: Los Angeles Kings 1971-1972, New York Islanders 1972-1989

Billy Smith

Billy Smith led the New York Islanders' dynasty to four straight Stanley Cup championships from 1980-1983 behind the pipes. By winning 19 consecutive playoff series, Smith and the Islanders created a record that will likely never be broken at the NHL level.

Grant Fuhr
No. 31: Edmonton Oilers 1983-1991, Toronto Maple Leafs 1991-1993, Buffalo Sabers 1993-1995, Los Angeles Kings 1994-1995, St. Louis Blues 1995-1999, Calgary Flames 1999-2000

Grant Fuhr

Fuhr had an incredible career in which he won five Stanley Cups. Fuhr played for many teams, but he is best known for his work with the Edmonton Oilers, where he had both his longest and most-dominant stretch. In 2003, Fuhr became the first black player in NHL history to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Jim Taylor
No. 31: Green Bay Packers 1958-1966, New Orleans Saints 1967

Jim Taylor

After an outstanding collegiate career at LSU, Taylor began his professional career with the Green Bay Packers. In ten seasons, Taylor was selected to five Pro Bowls and he won the 1962 NFL MVP.

Dave Winfield
No. 31: San Diego Padres 1973-1980, New York Yankees 1981-1990, Cleveland Indians 1995

Dave Winfield

In over two decades in the league, Winfield made 12 All-Star games, won seven Gold Gloves, and was a six-time Silver Slugger Award winner. Winfield wore No. 31 for the majority of his career, but did wear the number towards the end of his career with the Angels, Blue Jays and Twins.

Jon Lester
No. 31: Boston Red Sox 2006-2014, Oakland Athletics 2014

Jon Lester

The first active player to make the list, Lester is currently a pitcher for the Chicago Cubs. Lester was a key piece of the Boston Red Sox teams that won the 2007 and 2013 World Series. At 32-years-old, Lester is still one of the top pitchers in all of baseball, particularly among lefties.

William Andrews
No. 31: Atlanta Falcons 1979-1983, 1986

William Andrews

From 1980-1983, Andrews made four straight Pro Bowls as a running back for the Atlanta Falcons, but his career was cut far too short when he suffered a massive knee injury in the 1984 preseason. Andrews attempted a comeback two seasons later, but he was not the dominating force he was in the early 1980s.

Cedric Maxwell
No. 31: Boston Celtics 1977-1985

Cedric Maxwell

The forward won two championships as a member of the Boston Celtics in his eight seasons with the team. In December of 2003, "Cornbread" had his No. 31 retired by the team.

Kam Chancellor
No. 31: Seattle Seahawks 2010-present

Kam Chancellor

Chancellor is now known as one of the most feared players in all of the NFL, but he had to overcome long odds to get this far. Chancellor was the No. 133 pick in the 2010 NFL Draft and he did not start a single game in his rookie season. Four years later, Chancellor is a Super Bowl champion and has appeared in four Pro Bowls.

Curtis Joseph
No. 31: St. Louis Blues 1989-1995, Edmonton Oilers 1995-1998, Toronto Maple Leafs 1998-2002, 2008-2009, Detroit Red Wings 2002-2005, Phoenix Coyotes 2005-2008, Calgary Flames 2008

Curtis Joseph

Curtis "CuJo" Joseph played for six NHL teams and rocked No. 31 for all of them. His success for so many different franchises caused Joseph to become the first goalie in league history to have 30+ regular season wins for five different teams.

Pelle Lindbergh
No. 31: Philadelphia Flyers 1981-1985

Pelle Lindbergh

Lindbergh had a brief but successful career in the NHL as a goalie for the Philadelphia Flyers. Lindbergh only played in parts of five seasons for the Flyers, but won the Vezina Trophy in 1985. In November of 1985, Lindbergh’s life and career were cut short when he died in a car accident.

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Follow Adam Braunstein on Twitter @braunstein_adam.

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