Babe Ruth, Allen Iverson Dwyane Wade

Dwyane Wade can continue wearing No. 3 with the Bulls. Doug McDermott, who wore No. 3 the past two seasons for Chicago, has already said he is giving it up.

Alex Rodriguez didn't have this kind of luck when he joined the Yankees. After wearing No. 3 with the Mariners and Rangers, A-Rod had to look for something else because the Yankees had long retired it in honor of Babe Ruth.

Ruth, A-Rod and Wade all made our short list of best athletes who wore No. 3. Now we didn't include some athletes who might have worn No. 3 for a small part of their career. For example, Ken Griffey Jr. wore No. 3 for a few seasons in Cincinnati, but he is most identified as being No. 24 or No. 30.

Dale Earnhardt

Dale Earnhardt

Earnhardt won an astonishing seven Winston Cups (now known as Sprint Cups) in what still stands a tie for the all-time record with Richard Petty. Earnhardt tragically passed away in a crash on the final lap of the 2001 Daytona 500. He was posthumously inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame's inaugural class of 2010.

Jimmie Foxx

Jimmie Foxx

Spending most of his 20-year career with the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox, Foxx was a dominant power hitting first baseman, becoming the youngest player to reach 500 home runs (at age 32) before being passed by Alex Rodriguez. Despite finishing his career as a pitcher, Foxx still ranks 18th in MLB history with 534 home runs, and he joined the Hall of Fame in 1951.

Allen Iverson

Allen Iverson

Chosen first overall in the legendary 1996 NBA draft, Iverson lived up to the gaudy expectations in a phenomenal career primarily with the Philadelphia 76ers. Winning MVP honors and carrying his team to the NBA Finals in 2001, the 165-pound guard became the epitome of grit and hustle, finishing his career ranked seventh in NBA history with an average of 26.7 points and being elected to the Hall of Fame in 2016.

Harmon Killebrew

Harmon Killebrew

Most of Killebrew’s 22-year MLB career came with the Senators/Twins franchise as a corner infielder. Currently 12th on the all-time home run list with 573, Killebrew was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Dale Murphy

Dale Murphy

Playing most of his 18-year career with the Braves, Murphy absolutely dominated after being moved to the outfield in 1980, winning NL MVPs in 1982 and 1983 and five Gold Gloves in the decade. Murphy is one of three retired players in MLB history to win multiple MVPs and not be inducted into the Hall of Fame.

Bronko Nagurski

Bronko Nagurski

Playing both defensive tackle and fullback, Nagurski was a true ironman, dominating on both sides of the ball at Minnesota and then with the Chicago Bears en route to being inducted to both the College Football and NFL Hall of Fame. The Bronko Nagurski Award is annually given to the best defensive college football player in the FBS.

Candace Parker

Candace Parker

Parker seized attention nationwide when becoming the first woman to dunk in an NCAA tournament game while at Tennessee. With the Los Angeles Sparks in 2008, she became the first WNBA player to win Rookie of the Year and MVP honors in the same season. Parker won another MVP award in 2013.

Chris Paul

Chris Paul

Known as CP3, Paul has long been in the conversation for the league's top point guard, making eight consecutive All-Star games and leading the league in assists per game in four of the past eight years. Only 31, Paul is already 11th in NBA history with 7,688 career assists.

Pierre Pilote

Pierre Pilote

Playing 13 of his 14 NHL seasons with the Blackhawks, Pilote was one of the league's premier defensemen in the 1960s. He won three consecutive Norris Trophy awards from 1963 to 1965, and helped Chicago capture the Stanley Cup in 1961. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1975.

Christie Rampone

Christie Rampone

Rampone has been a mainstay in the defensive backfield for the U.S. national women’s soccer team, being the only player on the roster for both the 1999 and 2015 World Cup champion teams. Rampone has also been on three consecutive Olympic gold medal winners, and when she came off the bench in last year’s 5-2 win over Japan, the then-40-year-old became the oldest woman to appear in a World Cup match.

Alex Rodriguez

Alex Rodriguez

Although A-Rod has worn No. 13 since joining the Yankees in 2004, his achievements with the Mariners and Rangers still warrant some recognition. From 1996 to 2003, he made seven All-Star Games, led the MLB in home runs three times, and won AL MVP honors in 2003.

Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth

Known as the Great Bambino or the Sultan of Swat, Ruth ushered in the "live-ball" era by shattering just about every power hitting record that existed in the early 20th century. Finishing his career with 714 home runs (which still ranks third) and 2,213 RBI (now second-most), Ruth was an easy pick for the Hall of Fame's inaugural class of 1936.

Dwyane Wade

Dwyane Wade

Selected fifth overall by Miami in the stacked 2003 NBA draft, Wade was the face of the Heat franchise for 13 seasons. He led the team to the 2006 championship before winning two more titles with LeBron James. Wade, who has made 12 consecutive All-Star Games, recently shocked the basketball world by signing with the Bulls to play in his native Chicago.

Russell Wilson

Russell Wilson

Not drafted until the third round in 2012 due to size concerns, Wilson immediately earned the starting job in Seattle and dominated in his first four years. He is the only QB in NFL history to have a passer rating north of 100 in each of his first two seasons, and he led the Seahawks to their first Super Bowl title in the 2013 season.

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