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Some of the largest sponsors of FIFA published an open letter this week highlighting their demands for several reforms of how soccer's organizing body does business.

Adidas, Visa, McDonald's, Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch InBev were jointly listed on the letter, which is addressed to the FIFA executive committee. That committee is gathering this week to select the reforms it will present to all 209 member organizations in February.

First and foremost, according to the letter, is a reform strategy that increases transparency of how FIFA does business.

Casting Sepp Blatter For Ben Affleck's FIFA Movie

 

Casting For Sepp Blatter

Ben Affleck and Matt Damon are producing a movie about the FIFA scandal.

 

Dustin Hoffman

He was great as a villain in "Hook."

 

Dustin Hoffman

Hoffman's versatility makes him capable of handling nearly any role.

 

Gerard Depardieu

Here's a unique qualification for playing a role of villian: Being actual friends with Vladimir Putin.

 

Gerard Depardieu

In his autobiography, Depardieu writes that Putin "immediately liked my hooligan side."

 

James Garner

Yes, we realize that Garner passed away last year ...

 

James Garner

... but the resemblance is uncanny.

 

John Cusack

Cusack is 30 years younger than Blatter.

 

John Cusack

But the magic of Hollywood makeup can do wonders in bridging the gap.

 

Tommy Lee Jones

One of his most memorable roles was on the side of law enforcement as a U.S. Marshal in "The Fugitive" but ...

 

Tommy Lee Jones

... he did play the villain role of Two Face in "Batman Forever."

 

Robert Duvall

The ultimate pro, Duvall always delivers in whatever role he's given.

 

Robert Duvall

Duvall is 84, and we know he'd still come through.

 

Alan Arkin

At 81, Arkin is in the same age range as Blatter.

 

Alan Arkin

As a 72-year-old, Arkin earned the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in "Little Miss Sunshine."

 

Danny DeVito

Everyone loved to hate him as Louie De Palma on "Taxi."

 

Danny DeVito

Plus, he played the Penguin in "Batman Returns."

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"We are aware of the positive work that the Reform Committee has been doing on governance reform, but we still believe any reforms should be subject to independent oversight," according to the letter. "It has also become clear to us that such independent oversight needs to run long-term through the implementation and evolution of the reform process. We encourage you to become champions of this independent oversight as it will only enhance FIFA's credibility."

The letter also makes clear the sponsors' desire for FIFA to become a more inclusive organization that contributes positively to the world.

"Transparency, accountability, respect for human rights, integrity, leadership and gender equality are crucial to the future of FIFA. Reforms can set the proper framework for these characteristics, but a cultural change is also needed," per the letter.

Some of those comments seem to relate directly to FIFA's decision to award a World Cup to Qatar, which has built a rich society on the backs of slavery and human rights violations, and where homosexuality is illegal.

Those sponsors, who pay FIFA somewhere around $100 million each per four-year World Cup cycle, offer a stern insistence for FIFA to make significant changes at this critical point in the organization's juncture.

"The actions you take with this first round of reform proposals will set the tone for the full Congress to get behind the reform process."

Much of FIFA's leadership has already been implicated in widespread fraud uncovered in massive investigations by both the United States and Switzerland. The remaining leadership will be under the microscope to distance itself from the past and position FIFA for a much different future.

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