Calvin Hill, Grant Hill

The Mannings usually top the list of father-son athlete combinations. If not, it would be Bobby Bonds and Barry Bonds. Or Bobby Hull and Brett Hull. But all those second-generation stars played the same sport as their old man. This list is different. It's all about pro athletes who had sons or daughters who made it as a professional but in a different sport:

Mychal Thompson, Trayce Thompson

Mychal Thompson, Trayce Thompson

Mychal Thompson (NBA): A first team All-American at Minnesota, Thompson was the first pick in the 1978 NBA Draft, spending 14 seasons in the league and winning a pair of titles with the Lakers in the 1980s. He also is the father of current Warriors’ superstar Klay.

Trayce Thompson (MLB): The younger brother of Klay, Trayce entered the major leagues in 2015, and has broken into the stacked Dodgers' outfield with 11 home runs and a .519 slugging percentage in his first 58 games of 2016.

Calvin Hill, Grant Hill

Calvin Hill, Grant Hill

Calvin Hill (NFL): A Yale graduate, Hill was the first Ivy League alumnus to be selected in the first round of an NFL Draft in 1969. He proceeded to make four Pro Bowl appearances as a running back in his ten professional seasons, six of which came with the Dallas Cowboys.

Grant Hill (NBA): A two-time All-American at Duke, Hill made five NBA All-Star appearances in his six seasons with the Detroit Pistons. But injuries plagued him soon after, as he missed at least 50 games in four of the next five seasons to ruin the prime of what could've been a legendary career.

Ken Norton, Ken Norton Jr.

Ken Norton, Ken Norton Jr.

Ken Norton (boxing): The elder Norton went 42-7-1 and held the WBC heavyweight title in 1978. He also was one of the few boxers to top Muhammad Ali, going 1-2 in three bouts against The Greatest.

Ken Norton Jr. (NFL): A linebacker for the Cowboys and 49ers, Norton Jr. became the only player in NFL history to win three consecutive Super Bowls with his service for both teams. He later served as the Seahawks' linebackers’ coach, and now is the Raiders' defensive coordinator.

Popeye Jones, Seth Jones

Popeye Jones, Seth Jones

Popeye Jones (NBA): Popeye – legally named Ronald Jones – played 11 seasons for seven NBA teams, and now serves as an assistant coach for the Indiana Pacers.

Seth Jones (NHL): Drafted fourth overall in 2013 by Nashville, Jones has already racked up 17 goals and 66 assists in his four NHL seasons as a defenseman. He was traded to Columbus in January 2016.

Related: How Seth Jones Picked Hockey

Jerry Goff, Jared Goff

Jerry Goff, Jared Goff

Jerry Goff (MLB): Drafted in the third round in 1986 by the Mariners out of Cal as a catcher, Goff made it to the major leagues in 1990. He played in parts of six seasons in the bigs and finishing with a .215 career average.

Jared Goff (NFL): Jared also attended Cal, where he threw for 96 touchdowns in three seasons as a starter. Drafted first overall this year, Goff will be tasked with bringing the newly relocated Los Angeles Rams back to national prominence.

Related: Jared Goff Clarifies How Big Of A Taylor Swift Fan He Is

Barry Larkin, Shane Larkin

Barry Larkin, Shane Larkin

Barry Larkin (MLB): Larkin played his entire 19-year career with the Cincinnati Reds, racking up 2,340 hits and 12 All-Star appearances as a shortstop. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2012.

Shane Larkin (NBA): After a strong two-year career at Miami that concluded with a 2013 ACC Player of the Year selection, Larkin has been a reserve guard for three NBA teams in the time since, averaging a career-best 7.3 points with the Brooklyn Nets in 2015-16.

Related: Barry Larkin's Career Milestones

Yannick Noah, Joakim Noah

Yannick Noah, Joakim Noah

Yannick Noah (tennis): Noah, a French tennis player, went 476-210 in singles matches in his career, reaching as high as No. 3 in the world singles rankings in 1986. Winning the 1983 French Open, he joined Arthur Ashe as the only black men in history to win a men's singles Grand Slam event.

Joakim Noah (NBA): After spearheading the Florida Gators to back-to-back titles in 2006 and 2007, Noah has played his entire professional career with the Bulls, making two All-Star appearances and two All-Defensive First Teams in his nine NBA seasons.

Related: Joakim Noah Recruits Derrick Rose, Taj Gibson For Gun Violence Documentary

Jack Snow, J.T. Snow

Jack Snow, J.T. Snow

Jack Snow (NFL): Drafted eighth overall out of Notre Dame as a receiver in 1965, Snow played all 11 of his seasons in his hometown of Los Angeles, finishing with 6,012 receiving yards for the Rams.

J.T. Snow (MLB): Snow played the majority of his 14-season career with the San Francisco Giants, earning six straight Gold Glove awards as a first baseman from 1995 to 2000.

Mike Conley, Mike Conley Jr.

Mike Conley, Mike Conley Jr.

Mike Conley (Olympics): Also a long jumper, Conley finished six separate years with the world's No. 1 in the triple jump, winning a silver medal in the 1984 Olympic Games and a gold medal in 1992 in his signature event.

Mike Conley Jr. (NBA): Drafted fourth overall in 2007, Conley Jr. has played his entire nine-season career with the Grizzlies, with whom he has averaged at least 14 points in each of the past four years. Conley Jr. is still in contention to make the 2016 USA Basketball Men’s Team, where he could follow in his dad's Olympian footsteps.

Alan Wiggins, Candice Wiggins

Alan Wiggins, Candice Wiggins

Alan Wiggins (MLB): After being drafted eighth overall in 1977, Wiggins made a name for himself as a speedy outfielder and second baseman, playing seven MLB seasons and setting a Padres single-season record that still stands with 70 steals in 1984.

Candice Wiggins (WNBA): Drafted third overall in 2008 after a dominant four-year career at Stanford, Wiggins spent most of her career with the Minnesota Lynx, with whom she won a WNBA title in 2011. She announced her retirement from the WNBA after the 2016 season.

Related: Wildest Brawls In MLB History

Julius Erving, Alexandra Stevenson

Julius Erving, Alexandra Stevenson

Julius Erving (NBA): Simply known as Dr. J, Erving was the face of the ABA before it merged with the NBA in 1976. From there, Erving spent 11 seasons with the 76ers, winning MVP honors in 1981 and ultimately being named to the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History in 1996.

Alexandra Stevenson (tennis): Stevenson – who kept the last name of her mother, Samantha – was ranked as highly as No. 18 in WTA singles in 2002. Her best Grand Slam performance was a 1999 semifinal appearance at Wimbledon, where she fell to eventual champion Lindsay Davenport.

Related: Shaq Reveals Why First Time He Met Julius Erving Is So Memorable

Dan Petry, Jeff Petry

Dan Petry, Jeff Petry

Dan Petry (MLB): Petry spent most of his 13-year MLB career with the Detroit Tigers, where he won a World Series in 1984 and made his only All-Star appearance the following year. He finished his career with a 125-104 record and a 3.95 ERA.

Jeff Petry (NHL): Drafted out of high school in 2006, Jeff played three seasons at Michigan State before turning pro. Since reaching the NHL in 2010-11, the defenseman has 25 goals and 72 assists with the Edmonton Oilers and Montreal Canadiens.

Bubba Paris, Courtney Paris

Bubba Paris, Courtney Paris

Bubba Paris (NFL): Playing eight of his nine seasons with the 49ers, Paris was a linchpin on the offensive line during Joe Montana's peak. Paris won three Super Bowls in San Francisco before retiring in 1991.

Courtney Paris (WNBA): With a massive 6-4, 250 pound frame, Paris was an absolute monster in the paint at Oklahoma, setting a still-standing NCAA record with 112 consecutive double-doubles. She has played for three WNBA teams, leading the league in rebounds per game in 2014 and 2015.

Related: Montana, Young And The NFL's Greatest Quarterback Controversy

John Stephens, Sloane Stephens

John Stephens, Sloane Stephens

John Stephens (NFL): Drafted 17th overall in 1988 by the Patriots, Stephens burst onto the scene immediately, racking up 1,168 rushing yards en route to NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year honors. Unfortunately, he couldn’t keep up the production for the rest of his career, retiring in 1993 and ultimately passing away in a car accident in 2009.

Sloane Stephens (tennis): Stephens has not yet won any Grand Slam titles in her brief professional career, but she has shown potential to become the next face of American women's tennis, beating Serena Williams en route to a 2013 semifinal appearance at the Australian Open. Stephens, only 23, has already been ranked as highly as No. 11 in the WTA rankings in 2013.

Lonnie Shelton, L.J. Shelton

Lonnie Shelton, L.J. Shelton

Lonnie Shelton (NBA): Shelton, a power forward, averaged 12.0 points in a 10-year NBA career with three different teams. He started for the Seattle SuperSonics in 1979, helping them to their only NBA championship.

L.J. Shelton (NFL): After two first team all-MAC selections at Eastern Michigan, Shelton was drafted 21st overall in 1999 by Arizona. He went on to play 10 NFL seasons as an offensive tackle, six of which came with the Cardinals.

Lee Lacy, Jennifer Lacy

Lee Lacy, Jennifer Lacy

Lee Lacy (MLB): An outfielder, Lacy played 16 MLB seasons with four different teams from 1972-87. After falling short in three World Series with the Dodgers, Lacy finally won the trophy playing on the Pirates in 1979.

Jennifer Lacy (WNBA): Lacy went undrafted out of Pepperdine in 2006, but has worked hard enough to stay in the WNBA for 10 seasons. A 6-3 forward, Lacy earned her only WNBA title with the Phoenix Mercury in 2007.

Johnny Perkins, Jia Perkins

Johnny Perkins, Jia Perkins

Johnny Perkins (NFL): Despite playing for Division I-AA Abilene Christian, Perkins was drafted in the second round in 1997 by the Giants. He spent all of his seven professional seasons in New York and finished with 2,611 receiving yards. In 1981, Perkins helped the Giants make the playoffs for the first time in 18 seasons, and he caught two touchdown passes in a divisional-round loss at San Francisco, the eventual Super Bowl champions.

Jia Perkins (WNBA): A third-round draft pick out of Texas Tech in 2004, Perkins has played 12 seasons in the WNBA, averaging double figures scoring in each of the past nine. Perkins made her lone All-Star appearance in 2009 with the Chicago Sky.

Kenny Williams, Kyle Williams

Kenny Williams, Kyle Williams

Kenny Williams (MLB): Williams had 27 home runs in seven MLB seasons, but that's not the only way he has made an impact on professional baseball. He served as the GM for the White Sox, where he played four of his seasons, from 2000-2012, which included winning the 2005 World Series.

Kyle Williams (NFL): Williams has been a bit of a journeyman since being drafted in 2010, as he is about to play for his fourth team after being signed by the Jets this offseason. Williams was the Broncos' roster last season, but didn't play because of injury.

Marvell Wynne, Marvell Wynne

Marvell Wynne, Marvell Wynne

Marvell Wynne (MLB): The elder Wynne played seven MLB seasons for three teams, with a career year in 1984 with 174 hits and 77 runs while playing for the Pirates.

Marvell Wynne (soccer): The No. 1 overall pick at the 2006 MLS SuperDraft, Wynne has played 10 seasons as a defender for four different teams, winning the MLS Cup with the Colorado Rapids in 2010.

Mark Schlereth, Daniel Schlereth

Mark Schlereth, Daniel Schlereth

Mark Schlereth (NFL): Schlereth was drafted 263rd overall in 1989, but he still worked his way to respect in a 12-year NFL career. He made Pro Bowl appearances as a guard in 1991 and 1998, and also won three combined Super Bowls with the Redskins and Broncos.

Daniel Schlereth (MLB): Drafted 26th overall in 2008, Schlereth played four MLB seasons as a setup man for the Diamondbacks and Tigers, finishing his career with 91 strikeouts and a 4.35 ERA in 93 innings.

Manu Tuiasosopo, Matt Tuiasosopo

Manu Tuiasosopo, Matt Tuiasosopo

Manu Tuiasosopo (NFL): After a dominant career at UCLA, Tuiasosopo, a Los Angeles native, was drafted 18th overall by the Seahawks in 1979. He proceeded to play eight NFL seasons, making 9.5 sacks in his career.

Matt Tuiasosopo (MLB): Drafted in the third round by the Mariners in 2004 out of high school, Matt has fluctuated between the major and minor leagues for several teams in the time since. He has 12 career major league home runs, but was designated by assignment by the Braves earlier in 2016.

Pat Richter, Barry Richter

Pat Richter, Barry Richter

Pat Richter (NFL): After playing football, basketball and baseball at Wisconsin, Richter was a Redskins receiver from 1963 to 1970. He later returned to Wisconsin to serve as the school's athletic director from 1989 to 2004.

Barry Richter (NHL): Like his father, Barry also had a dominant career at Wisconsin, but his domain was the hockey rink. He went on to play parts of five NHL seasons as a defenseman, finishing with 11 goals and 34 assists.

Related: Heisman Trophy Legacy Of Wisconsin Running Back Alan Ameche

Tommy O'Connell, Mike O'Connell

Tommy O'Connell, Mike O'Connell

Tommy O'Connell (NFL): O'Connell played three NFL seasons as a quarterback, most notably taking over as the Browns' starter in 1957 after Otto Graham's retirement. He led the team to an appearance in the NFL Championship Game while averaging a still-standing league record of 11.17 passing yards per attempt.

Mike O'Connell (NHL): Mike had a 13-year NHL career as a defenseman, making an appearance in the 1984 NHL All-Star game with the Boston Bruins. He proceeded to serve as Bruins GM from 2000 to 2006.

Kyle Rote, Kyle Rote Jr.

Kyle Rote, Kyle Rote Jr.

Kyle Rote (NFL): The top overall pick in the 1951 NFL draft out of SMU, Rote had a dominant career as a running back for the Giants, making four Pro Bowls in his 11 seasons before later returning to the team as an assistant coach.

Kyle Rote Jr. (soccer): Originally a football player at Oklahoma State, Rote Jr. made the switch to soccer after suffering a broken leg – and it paid off tremendously. The forward led the North American Soccer League in scoring in 1973 and was inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame in 2009.

Ted Brown, J.T. Brown

Ted Brown (NFL): A first-round pick in 1979, Brown played eight seasons with the Vikings. He ran for 4,546 yards and 40 touchdowns. Brown also caught 339 passes and 13 touchdowns. On January 9, 1983, Brown scored the winning touchdown in Minnesota's 30-24 win against Atlanta in a wild-card playoff game.

J.T. Brown (NHL): Brown, a right wing, helped University of Minnesota Duluth win the 2011 NCAA championship but went undrafted. He signed with the Tampa Bay Lightning in 2012. He posted career highs of 78 games and eight goals in 2015-16.

Joe Laurinaitis, James Laurinaitis

Joe Laurinaitis, James Laurinaitis

Joe Laurinaitis (Wrestling): Known as Animal, Joe was part of the legendary tag team of The Road Warriors that dominated worldwide competitions from 1983 to 2003 until the death of partner Hawk (Michael Hegstrand). Laurinaitis has also made occasional singles appearances, and hasn't yet officially retired.

James Laurinaitis (NFL): After a legendary career at Ohio State including three first team All-America nods, Laurinaitis played seven seasons with the Rams, in which he set the franchise's all-time tackles record with 916. He signed with the Saints during the 2016 offseason.

Related: When 'Some Asian Kid' Won Dusty Rhodes' Boots

Ted Irvine, Chris Jericho

Ted Irvine, Chris Jericho

Ted Irvine (NHL): A left winger, Irvine played 11 seasons in the NHL with the Bruins, Kings, Rangers and Blues. He finished with 154 goals and 177 assists.

Chris Jericho (Wrestling): Jericho (legally named Chris Irvine), has professionally wrestled for nearly three decades, becoming the first undisputed WWF (now WWE) heavyweight champion after defeating Dwayne (The Rock) Johnson and (Stone Cold) Steve Austin on the same night in 2001.

More Dad Features:
-- Hall Of Fame Writer Ross Newhan And His MLB Son Share Unique Baseball Bond
-- Writer's Love Of Hoops Comes From Special Driveway Game With Dad
-- Marques And Kris Johnson Share Honors, Special Connection Through Basketball

Cole Jacobson contributed to this report.