Ripped abs are reason enough to add some core moves to your routine. But a strong torso can also give you the foundation you need to lift more weight with less risk of injury. "Crunches alone won't get the job done, though," says Todd Durkin, C.S.C.S., author of The IMPACT! Body Plan." You need to train the two dozen muscles between your hips and shoulders the way they function."

That means doing moves that bend and stabilize your core. The exercises in this weekend's challenge -- the running man, side ups, plank to pushup, and cross-body mountain climbers -- do both of those things. "They'll test your core from every angle," Durkin says. "The better you are at these, the stronger you'll be in everything else you do." (Think you have the pushup down? Think again. Here are 5 Body-Weight Exercises You're Doing Wrong.)

Here's how it works: Grab a stopwatch. Perform 20 reps of each exercise in the following order: running man, sideup (right side), plank to pushup, sideup (left side), and cross-body mountain climber. Todd's time, and your goal: 1 minute and 48 seconds. Let us know your score in the comments below.

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We found 3 simple tricks to perfect your form and protect your shoulders: The Best Way to Do Pushups.

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When it comes to revving your metabolism, one move reigns king. "The squat burns more calories per rep than almost any other exercise because it hits a lot of muscles, particularly big ones like you glutes, hamstrings, and quads," says Todd Durkin, C.S.C.S., author of The IMPACT! Body Plan. This weekend, push your calorie-burning furnace into overdrive with Durkin's sinister squat and jump rope challenge. (Try these 5 Secrets to a Perfect Workout and you'll never be held back in the gym again!)

Here's how it works: Start with a descending squat ladder. Do 10 goblet squat to presses. When you finish, immediately drop the dumbbell and perform 10 bodyweight jump squats. Next, perform nine goblet squat to presses followed by nine bodyweight jump squats. Continue to decrease the number of reps by one every round. Your last round of squats should consist of one goblet squat to press and one jump squat. End the challenge with 100 rope jumps. Do them as fast as possible to supercharge your metabolism for hours after you're done. (Want to get the most from your workout? Then take the advice of this The Fitness Rule You Must Follow.)

Ready to try it? Durkin completed this challenge in 4 minutes and 17 seconds. Let us know if you beat his score in the comments below.

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Do these Fat-Blasting Cardio Combos just once, and you'll rethink cardio forever.

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One sentence you aren't likely to hear: "Those crunches were so much fun!"

In fact, you'll rarely hear that kind of declaration with any exercise. Which is too bad, for plenty of reasons.

But we've found three new core exercises that are indeed fun. Yes, they work your abs. Yes, they're effective. (Super-effective, actually.) And yes, they're hard. Yet despite this last concession, people absolutely love them.

How about you? Check out these awesome moves -- and have a blast, blasting your abs.

Mountain Climber with Feet on the Wall
If you're looking for ways to keep your ab workout challenging (and interesting!), then you must try the "mountain climber with feet against a wall." Yes, that's a mouthful. But this move--from fitness expert BJ Gaddour, owner of StreamFit.com--is without a doubt one of the coolest new core exercises we've seen in a while. It'll fry your abs, but it also works your shoulders and glutes. So much so, that it’ll help improve your performance at all the other exercises in your workout. “There’s no better way to train the weak spots that are holding you back in every other lift,” says Gaddour. (You can Bolster Your Shoulders, put your strength to the test--and grow bigger--with the ultimate overhead exercise.)

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Kettlebell Figure 8
The kettlebell figure 8 looks more like a kid’s game than it does a cutting-edge core exercise. But make no mistake: It’s a terrific way to train the muscles that stabilize your spine, says David Jack, director of TeamWorks Fitness in Acton, Massachusetts. And because you’re moving the weight in a figure-8 around your body, you work those core muscles from every angle. Plus, this exercise also challenges your thighs and shoulders, helping you build a healthier total-body. (Build muscle and fry fat all over with this killer Total-Body Kettlebell Workout.)

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Plank Walkup with Dumbbell Drag
This exercise is courtesy of sandbag-training expert Josh Henkin and Men’s Health adviser Rachel Cosgrove, creator of the Men’s Health Spartacus Workout Series (our legendary fat-blasting boot camp). The plank walkup with dumbbell drag is a new--and much more fun!--version of the classic plank. What makes it so novel and, more importantly, so effective? While in a plank position, it requires you to drag a dumbbell from one side of your body to another. "The plank exercise is about keeping your core perfectly stable," says Cosgrove. "Adding the dumbbell drag means that you have to still maintain core stability while you move a load back and forth, making it an extremely challenging version of the plank." (To make it even harder, you can use a sandbag instead of a dumbbell.)

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Boost your gains by downsizing your workout with The One Dumbbell Workout.

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One of the most intriguing prospects in the NBA draft is 18-year-old Dante Exum. He is a 6-6 point guard from Australia, who had considered playing college basketball in the United States last season but opted to stay home. Although he was recruited by traditional powerhouse programs such as Indiana, Kentucky and North Carolina, Exum remains largely a mystery to fans. In preparation for the draft, Exum did some cutting-edge testing of his physical and mental capabilities with Red Bull. This included wearing brain-monitoring sensors to gauge how he responds to different situations. Here's a more detailed look:

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Los Angeles Angels All-Star outfielder Mike Trout is the first baseball player since Ken Griffey Jr., to get a personal shoe designed by Nike. As part of the unveiling, Nike offered media members a chance to do a workout run by Trout's offseason trainer, Dan Richter.

ThePostGame, obviously knowing a thing or two about this intern's decorated junior varsity cross-country career, tapped me for the exercise. I'm still young enough to get carded (at R-rated movies, that is), and Trout himself told me that I look fit.

But truth be told, I'm a long way from my JV running and seventh-grade baseball heydays (season stat-line: 0-for-3 with five or six walks -- Billy Beane should have scouted me for that astounding OBP), so I was a little apprehensive about the prospect of doing Trout’s workout. ThePostGame's executive producer, Jeremy Berg, had gone through Kobe Bryant's regimen a few years earlier at a similar Nike event and claimed it left him sore for three weeks.

Even more intimidating was the idea of competing against a bunch of other reporters -- you know, the people who are always criticizing the world's best athletes for not running fast enough or hitting enough home runs. These people, I thought, must be at the peak of Herculean fitness and power.

Thankfully, Richter took it easy and led us through what must have been a tenth of Trout's real workout. I also felt an ego boost from running three sprints in 55 seconds when Trout does them in a minute. (What? He finishes six sprints in a minute. OK, let's ignore that irrelevant little detail.)

I touched the top of the Cal State Fullerton fence, and I'm sure that keeping track of a flying baseball while angling my body and timing the leap perfectly are pretty simple next steps to robbing a batter of a home run. We also went through other routine drills like shuffling and planking, which I successfully completed.

I bet Trout thinks he's really impressive with his own shoe and a fancy name for it like "Vapor." He and his corporate wardrobe still have nothing on my T-shirt from high school Senior Day. And sure, Trout has tallied more Wins Above Replacement (WAR) than any player in MLB history through his age-21 season, but perhaps he isn't familar with this concept.

Trout is two years older than I am, so maybe I still have enough time to develop the requisite strength, bat speed, pitch recognition, hops, endurance, agility, maturity and baseball IQ to become his equal on the diamond.

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We polled Men's Health readers on the body parts they want to work the most, and two areas topped the list: abs and arms. To give you what you want, we turned to BJ Gaddour, C.S.C.S. -- one of the top metabolic conditioning coaches in the world -- to create a workout that smokes your upper body. (You can Bolster Your Shoulders, put your strength to the test--and grow bigger--with the ultimate overhead exercise.)

He came back to us with a routine that consists of the single-arm dumbbell curl and press. Sure, it's only one move, but it's a brutal one. "It smokes your biceps, upper chest, traps, upper back, and triceps," says Gaddour, "and since you're only holding a dumbbell in one hand, your abs have to fight to stay steady as the weight pulls you to the side." (Boost your gains by downsizing your workout with The One Dumbbell Workout.)

It sounds simple enough, but fair warning: It won't be easy. That's because you'll perform 10 different variations of the move for 10 minutes straight. Each variation will challenge your arms and abs in a new way, so your muscles never know what's coming next.

"You'll spend almost the entire 10 minutes working," says Gaddour. "It's intense, but that training density increases your production of growth hormone, promoting fat loss and muscle building, and cranking up your metabolism to an insane level." Think your arms and abs are ready for the attack?

Watch the video below, and follow along as Gaddour takes you through the workout.

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And if you want more quick fat-burning routines like the Arms and Abs Assault, check out 10-Minute Torchers, the new DVD set from Men's Health. You can build your own workouts from a menu of 12 routines. Each one is only 10 minutes long, but they're all lung-busting challenges. The more of them you do in a row, the hotter your metabolic fire will burn.

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You learned how to tie your shoes sometime around kindergarten. But that doesn't mean it's the best bind for your running sneakers. (These 14 awesome kicks will help you conquer the outdoors this summer. Check out our 2014 Running Shoe Guide.)

In fact, if you've ever tripped over a rogue lace or found yourself retying your shoes during a run, you're probably lacing up all wrong. There's a better way to do it, according to Jeff Dengate, Runner's World shoes and gear editor. It's called the reef knot, and it only gets tighter as you run. (Read about these 5 common running shoe claims before buying your next pair.)

Check out the technique in the video below, and remember that laces are laces, so it will work on any kind of shoe that requires tying.

Be strong, energetic, and healthy like you were at 25!

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A couple of month's ago, Men's Health asked Alwyn Cosgrove, C.S.C.S. -- one of the world's top trainers -- to create a cutting-edge fat loss program for Men's Health. And, of course, he obliged. But a curious thing: One of the workouts in the plan featured just two exercises.

That's right: When asked to create a super-effective, calorie-torching routine, Cosgrove gave us a workout that had readers do only a dumbbell swing and a squat thrust. This confused some folks, who wondered, "How can you lose fat with just two exercises?"

Cosgrove's response: "Running is just one exercise, but no one questions that when it comes to burning fat." (Another great way to lose fat: Avoid the 20 worst drinks in America.)

He makes a good point. And in fact, once you understand the philosophy behind Cosgrove's routine, you start to see why it works so well. But first, an explanation of the actual routine itself.

Here's how it works: You do 15 repetitions of the kettlebell swing (you can also use a dumbbell for this), followed immediately by 15 reps of the squat thrust. (See below for descriptions of both exercises.) Then, without resting, do another 14 reps of the swing and another 14 reps of the squat thrust. Continue this pattern until you complete only one rep of each exercise. This is called a countdown workout.

Sure, that's just two exercises, but do the math: If you complete the entire routine -- from 15 down to one -- you'll do 120 repetitions of each exercise. That's 240 repetitions. And these aren't just any exercises: They're movements that challenge your entire body. (Chisel the six-pack you've always wanted with these tips!)

They're also done at a fast pace. On average, it'll only take you about three seconds per rep. So you'll do those 240 reps in just 12 minutes or so. That'll light your muscles on fire and have you gasping for air (in a good way).

If you think that sounds too easy or too fast, I suggest you try it. You may find you can't even finish. But that's OK -- you can just start with a lower number of reps, like eight, and work your way up as you improve your fitness. (In fact, I recommend this strategy.) If you want an even greater challenge, you can always take a breather and repeat the routine.

Remember: Whether you're running or lifting, your muscles require energy to help you move. And this workout forces more of your muscles into action than you'd ever use while jogging for the same duration. It'll also boost your metabolism for hours after your workout.

What's more, unlike jogging, these aren't joint-pounding exercises. So this is actually a "low-impact" workout that you can do at a high intensity, making it ideal for overweight folks. The best part: You can do the routine without even leaving your house since all you need is a single kettlebell or dumbbell. (And for another fast way to fight fat, check out this awesome kettlebell workout routine.)

An important note: This isn't a complete workout program, but it is a great routine that you can do almost anywhere, anytime. And it's a fantastic substitute for 15 minutes on the treadmill.

Kettlebell (or Dumbbell) Swing

Bend at your hips, and hold a kettlebell (or dumbbbell) with both hands at arm’s length in front of you. Now, rock back slightly and “hike” the kettlebell between your legs. Then squeeze your glutes, thrust your hips forward forcefully, and swing the weight to shoulder height. Allow momentum to swing the weight--you're not trying to actively lift it with your arms. Reverse the movement, so that you swing the kettlebell between your legs again. Make sure you don't round your lower back at any time; it should stay naturally arched when you bend at your hips. Continue to swing back and forth. Watch the video below to see fitness expert David Jack show you how to do the kettlebell swing with perfect form:

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Beat your workout plateaus with this 5-move Total-Body Muscle Assault.

Squat Thrust

Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Bending at your hips and knees, squat down and lower your body until you can place your hands on the floor. Kick your legs backward--into a pushup position--and then immediately reverse the move and quickly stand up from the squat. That's one rep. To make the exercise even more challenging, you can jump up from the squat instead of simply standing up quickly. Watch the video below to see strength coach David Jack do the squat thrust:

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Try these 5 Secrets to a Perfect Workout and you'll never be held back in the gym again!

This story originally appeared in Women’s Health.

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Pumping out pushups at warp speed may make you feel invincible, but slowing them down has big benefits. "The tempo pushup -- which involves moving slowly up and down without pausing -- keeps your muscles under tension longer," says David Jack, owner of ActivPrayer in Phoenix, Arizona, and creator of Men's Health 60-Day Transformation. "This forces them to work harder to complete each rep. You will feel the burn!"

Taking a slower pace also targets your Type I muscle fibers. While these fibers don't grow as large as your Type II fibers (the ones that are used during powerful movements or big lifts), they are key for building muscular endurance, says Jack. The payoff: You can churn out rep after rep without losing steam. (We found 3 simple tricks to perfect your form and protect your shoulders: The Best Way to Do Pushups.)

Ready to try it? Watch the video to learn how to perform the tempo pushup with perfect form.

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Think you have the pushup down? Think again. Here are 5 Body-Weight Exercises You're Doing Wrong.

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On Sunday morning , Harriette Thompson, the 91-year-old marathoner, finished the Rock ’n’ Roll San Diego Marathon in 7:07:42, the fastest time on record by a woman age 90 or older.

"I feel wonderful," Thompson told Runner's World Newswire. “I feel very relieved and I feel very anxious to take a shower and then fall into bed."

Thompson said she wasn't able to train as much as she would have liked because she recently finished up radiation treatment to treat squamous cell carcinoma on her legs, but she surprised herself.

"I found that the first 13 miles were very easy and then around mile 17 it became a little harder,” she said. “I’m almost as surprised as everybody else."

PLUS: Why Older Runners Need Strength Training

Thompson's time was well under the previous fastest time in the women's 90-and-over division, 8:53:08, run by Mavis Lindgren at the 1997 Portland Marathon. The oldest female marathon finisher on record is Gladys Burrill, who ran the 2010 Honolulu Marathon in 9:53:16 at the age of 92.

Thompson's brother passed away in February from lymphoma, and since her marathon debut at 76, Thompson has run every year on behalf of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and Team In Training, generating more than $90,000.

“All I do is write a letter and [my friends] are all very generous,” she said.

MORE: 20-Minute Workout Boosts Cognitive Ability

Thompson says she’s looking forward to taking a shower and getting a good night's rest. Monday, she will celebrate her 67th wedding anniversary with her husband, Sydnor, 90, back in North Carolina.

Thompson said that, when she exercises, she just feels better. Her words of wisdom for other runners? “Sleep a lot and drink a lot of water.”

Thompson said she doesn’t think age should be a barrier for beginning exercise.

“You’re never too old to do it,” she said. “I started my first marathon at 76.”

When asked if she has any other marathons planned, Thompson says she’ll be back in San Diego next year “if I’m still here.”

“I’ll try and do better next year and be in better shape,” she said.

MORE: Fueling for Older Runners

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