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    Paul Pierce

    A Boston Celtics legend, Pierce has been one of the most consistent players in the past decade. His undeniable shooting and strength has earned him the title "The Truth." Ironically, Pierce has been able to deceive refs game after game with his flopping ability.

The 2013 NBA playoffs have been full of overtime thrillers, game-winning shots and unbelievable plays by some of the worlds greatest athletes.

There have also been a number of dramatic flops that have warranted fines. With flopping so prevelant in the NBA, one has to wonder: Who is the best at putting himself on his rear end?

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    10. Dominique Wilkins vs. Celtics, 1988

    A Hawks team featuring Dominique Wilkins and Doc Rivers take the Celtics to Game 7 in the first round. ‘Nique puts on a show, dropping 47 points against Larry Bird's C’s. But Larry Legend takes over late in the game, scoring 20 points in the fourth and to secure the Celtics' spot in the Conference Semifinals.

Players work the entire season for a chance to perform on the NBA’s biggest stage, and in these high-stakes situations, some stars propel their teams into legend. Others are remembered for their incredible performances despite having come in a losing effort. Here is the ranking of those players who delivered memorable efforts that in the end were in vain:

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    No. 10 Make Time

    Lack of time is the No. 1 excuse people provide for not exercising. Nielsen reports that Americans average four hours of TV time every day; there is a logical disconnect here. I know that most of what is on TV is crap anyway, and by making fitness a top priority, I find the time.

On the schoolyard field of battle known as gym class, I made the geeks look good. I was such a spaz that I always got picked last when teams were being selected, and the gym teacher seemed to hold me personally responsible for it taking him eight years to finish a phys ed degree.

I always came out of dodge ball with head trauma.

In university I got the "freshman 15" factored by three, and after seeing a vacation beach photo decided it was time to get in shape for the first time in my life. That was 1993, and I've never looked back.

Nowadays, I’m pretty ripped. Fitness isn't just a means to an end for me. I've never been tempted to buy some body-bow-blade-ellipto-flex-ab-cruncher because such things are crap and it's not a healthy attitude. I see exercise as not only about achieving goals, but a righteously ass-kicking attitude that needs to be embraced with vigor until the day I dirt-nap. Here are my 10 personal fitness commandments for living exercise that have kept me going strong for almost two decades.

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    2013: Arvind Mahankali

    Arvind Mahankali (New York Daily News)

The degree of difficulty in the Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee has increased dramatically in the past two decades. In earlier eras, the champion won on words such as luge, abalone, croissant and incisor. Challenging, but not ridiculous.

Arvind Mahankali of New York won this year's Bee, which began in 1925 for kids under 16.

Mahankali, 13, clinched the championship Thursday night in Washington by spelling knaidel.

Here's a look at the final words for other recent champions.

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Sure, those sharp young competitors in the National Spelling Bee have to tackle words like cymotrichous, esquamulose and xanthosis. But what about sportswriters who have to cover the likes of Mike Krzyzewski, Mark Teixeira and Jarrod Saltalamacchia?

The spelling bee wrapped up Thursday night, but maybe next year there can be a category for sports names. Here are some possibilities:

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    'Everest' is just 1 of its 3 names

    The Great Trigonometric Survey of British India originally spotted the mountain from Darjeeling, India, in the Himalayan foothills of West Bengal, nearly 140 miles away. They first named it Gamma, then Peak XV, and finally, in 1865, they settled on Mount Everest, a name that seems to evoke how the mountain stretches ever higher into the heavens, but was actually after Surveyor General Sir George Everest. Local names, however, are more imaginative. The Tibetans call it 'Chomolunga' (Goddess Mother of the World), and the Nepalese know it as 'Sagarmatha' (Ocean Mother/ Head of the Sky).

By Brian Berkovitz
The Active Times

For centuries, 29,035-foot Mt. Everest has captured the human imagination. First, it was considered sacred by the Nepalese who lived at its base. Later, when the British discovered it to be the highest point in the world, it took on a whole new meaning for people of every nation. As with all superlatives—the longest river, the biggest wave, the steepest rock face -- the tallest mountain has since attracted hordes of mountaineers who are driven by the desire to stand on top of the world.

This month marks the 60th anniversary of British climber Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Mt. Everest, which he claimed with his Sherpa guide Tenzing Norgay on May 29, 1953. The mountain has changed a lot since then. Nowadays, hundreds of mountaineers flock to Everest every spring, to take advantage of a brief 'window' of good weather between winter storms and the spring monsoons. They pay thousands of dollars, sacrifice months of their lives and risk death in pursuit of a fleeting moment above it all.

But despite the intense scrutiny, and the vast resources humans put into climbing Mt. Everest, it's still a mystery to much of the world. Few can comprehend just how little oxygen there is in the final 3,000 feet, an area that mountaineers call the "Death Zone" because nothing lives in its thin air, which can kill even the best-prepared climber. It's hard, too, to imagine the tons of garbage that litter the mountain, or to understand why fossilized sea creatures are embedded in the stone at its lofty summit. And its frozen flanks also harbor a few deeper mysteries that nobody's been able to solve.

These mysteries—and, indeed, the mountain itself—serve as good reminders of how small humans are in the grand scheme of things. Sure, more than 3,500 climbers have touched the top in the past 60 years. Base Camp has WiFi, there’s an airport nearby, sherpas and guides have the routine down pat, and rescue helicopters wait in the wings to pluck climbers from danger. But even today, no technology can reliably deliver humans to the top of the world without considerable risk. Everest is—despite all criticisms that it's become too soft—the great, uncaring equalizer. Perhaps that's why so many continue to trudge upward. As British mountaineer George Mallory put it before himself perishing below its summit, "Because it's there."

No matter how many people try their hand at it, adventure and intrigue cannot be sapped from such a powerful place. In celebration of the 60th anniversary of Everest's first ascent, we present you with 17 fascinating facts about the top of the world.

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    Charlotte Bobcats/Hornets

    The Hornets were Charlotte's original NBA franchise, replaced by the expansion Bobcats after relocating to New Orleans. The team hopes to reclaim the Hornets name starting in the 2014-15 season. Maybe some wins will also start coming then.

The New Orleans Hornets just became the New Orleans Pelicans. The Charlotte Bobcats will soon become the Charlotte Hornets, reclaiming the moniker from the franchise that moved to New Orleans. It may be confusing, but these aren't the first two teams to change names without changing locations. Once upon a time, the Boston Red Sox were known as the Boston Americans and the Pittsburgh Pirates as the Pittsburgh Alleghenys. Here are changes from the past 100 years:

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    Lakers-Celtics, 1985

    Game 1 of the 1985 NBA Finals is better known as the Memorial Day Massacre, as the Celtics pulverize the Lakers 148-114 in Boston Garden. The Lakers regroup and win the next game as well as the series, 4-2.

Thanks to those who lost their lives while fighting for our freedom, we're able to enjoy distractions like sports. Here are some moments from competition that helped make some past Memorial Days all the more memorable:

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    No. 10 Avocados

    Avocados get their creamy texture from healthy monounsaturated fats, which take a long time for our bodies to digest and, therefore, can help suppress appetite. They're also an excellent source of soluble fiber, which forms a thick gel as it travels through the gut, slowing digestion.

    Avocados are a versatile food -- you can slice them up into salads or sandwiches, mash them up for dips and spreads, blend them into a smoothie or eat them whole with a spoon. Remove the pit and squeeze some honey into the hole if you like them sweet, or sprinkle salt and pepper, and add a squeeze of lime for a savory treat.

Whether you are trying to lose weight or just eat healthier, keeping hunger and cravings at bay is essential to reaching your goal. Staying satisfied throughout the day also means you can be more focused at work and push harder when you're at the gym.

For the most part, fiber, protein and fat are considered the trifecta of satiety, as they take longer to pass through your digestive system, helping you stay fuller for longer.

Here are 10 foods to help curb your appetite.

More from AskMen: Top 99 Most Desirable Women Of 2013

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Alex Rodriguez's bank account is looking a little healthier after the Yankees' player reportedly sold his Miami Beach home for $30 million. According to GossipExtra.com, the more than 21,000 square foot house was bought by Rodriguez in 2010 for $7.4 million.

The mansion, according to the site, also features a batting cage and is only blocks from Heat stars Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh. It was originally listed in August 2012 for $38 million. He had, according to the New York Daily News, been renting it out for $125,000 a month.

It was reportedly listed by Sotheby's, which has a nice tour of the digs on its website.

The sale is likely a bright spot in the season for Rodriguez, who is recovering from hip surgery. He is expected to return to the Yankees following the All-Star break.

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