Ah, Wimbledon. The refreshing English drizzle. The grunting. And, those names! Just like any global sporting event, Wimbledon is a phonetician's dream and tennis announcer's nightmare. As a recent New York Times article points out, poor chair umpire Pascal Maria had to oversee a match between Alex Bogomolov Jr. and Alexandr Doglopolov. No amount of vocal warm-ups could prepare anyone for such a feat.

BBC commentator David Mercer, attending his 39th Wimbledon, told the Times he writes details about each player on an index card, with personal details in ink and phonetic pronunciation in pencil -- sometimes the players take issue with an announcer's pronunciation. When a game gets heated between players with tough names, some announcers will use the nationality (the Slovak, the French) to avoid mistakes.

In the multicultural spirit of Wimbledon, we've put together a list of just some of the most tongue-twisting and mellifluous names umpires and announcers will be faced with at this year's tournament. (Bogomolov and Doglopolov excluded -- those were just an amuse-bouche.)

There are many more Wimbledon names worthy of a plaque in a linguistics lab, and we encourage you to use the tournament as a phonetic warm-up for the London Games, where you'll encounter Irish swimmer Sycerika McMahon, Russian pole vaulter Yelena Isinbayeva and Indian archer Chekrovolu Swuro.

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Last month, LaDainian Tomlinson signed a one-day contract to retire as a San Diego Charger. A few days later, Roger Clemens was acquitted on all accounts of obstruction and lying to Congress about the use of performance-enhancing drugs. Meanwhile, the New Jersey State Senate will vote Thursday on a resolution aiming to request that Major League Baseball retire the No. 21 in honor of Roberto Clemente, as they did in 1997 with Jackie Robinson's No. 42.

Besides the involvement of superstar athletes, these stories seem to have little in common -- but by simply scanning the back of their jerseys, you'll find that they all wore the No. 21. And they're not the only sports legends to sport the number:

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By Jill Krasny

Joel Allen was just 26 when he quit his job as a software developer to pursue his lifelong dream of inventing a get-rich-quick scheme.

Things didn't pan exactly as planned: He ran out of money, fell in love and found his calling as a carpenter.
But a brilliant new idea struck him. Allen could use his carpentry skills and materials gathered from Craigslist to build an incredible treehouse on government land in the wilds of British Columbia. He'd live for free in style, right in the middle of one of the most inflated housing markets in the world.

Allen's treehouse, Hemloft, has been featured on his blog and in Dwell magazine. We asked him to share his story and some pictures.

For the complete slideshow of Joel Allen's treehouse...
go to
BusinessInsider.com.

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More From BusinessInsider.com:
-- Nestle's Infant Formula Scandal
-- Jessica Spaulding's Van Dwelling Adventure
-- The World's Largest Treehouse
-- How A Kid Became America's Hottest Entrepreneur

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While Kentucky's Anthony Davis is considered a can't-miss lock for the first pick in Thursday's NBA draft, there are plenty of men who came before who seemed like decent bets for great success. While superstars have emerged from the first pick, and most wind up with noteworthy careers, there's always a chance they'll be failures, relative to their draft status. This is a list of the guys that had the most trouble living up to the hype.

Did we miss anyone? Were we too harsh on a player's career? Let us know in the comments.

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  • 1 of 12

    Elgin Baylor

    While a junior at Seattle University, Baylor led the Chieftains (now the Redhawks) to the school's only Final Four appearance in 1958. Baylor's squad fell to Kentucky 84-72 in the final, but that did not take away from his remarkable tournament performance. With 135 points in five games, Baylor was awarded the tournament's MOP Award. One month later, he was drafted first overall by the Minneapolis Lakers. Baylor's Hall of Fame career included 23,149 points, 11,463 rebounds and 11 All-Star Game appearances. But Baylor never won an NBA Championship.

Assuming the universe remains intact by Thursday night, Anthony Davis will be a New Orleans Hornet. He will likely cap off a three-month period that will have seen him win the NCAA Most Outstanding Player Award and become the first overall pick in the NBA Draft.

Davis would not be the first to accomplish this feat. A total of 12 players before him have won NCAA Tournament MOP Awards and been first overall draft picks. Of those players, Davis is in some pretty good company: Eight are Hall of Famers.

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Don't look down. But if you're wearing "mandals" (or dating someone who does), you need to read this. Mandals are -- you guessed it -- man sandals. As one of the ultimate first world problems, man sandals are extremely difficult to do right, unless you are totally comfortable looking like a camp counselor, river guide or frequenter of music festivals.

We scoured the web in search of the best and worst mandals around. We hope this list helps you avoid being confused with Ug from "Salute Your Shorts."

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    1. Pull-Ups

    The pull-up is an amazing way to strengthen your upper back, trapezius muscles, shoulders and abs. If you really want to train like an MMA fighter, you have to be able to perform many, many pull-ups. (Quick review: pull-ups involve your palms facing away from your body. Chin-ups, which are easier, involve your palms facing toward your body.) If you have trouble doing even one—with good form, meaning smooth and under control, not relying on momentum—don’t worry. They’re hard. Build up your back muscles with bent-over rows and lat pulldowns. Then move on to assisted pull-ups, chin-ups and finally the real deal.

By Jay Cardiello

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Gentlemen, just because you're going to the beach doesn't mean you can get away with an utterly uninspired daily combo of board shorts and undershirts. Whether you're jet setting with your significant other or hoping to find one on your travels, why not put a little effort into your warm weather look? We promise you she'll appreciate it.

There you have it. You won't need anything else this summer but a good time. Now get it together and get out the door.

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Power, Summer

By Monami Thakur

At the 40th anniversary of the Family Circle Cup tennis tournament in Charleston, members of the "Original Nine" who started the Women's Tennis Association in the year 1970 were honoured.

Valerie Ziegenfuss, Billie Jean King, Nancy Richey, Jane "Peaches" Bartkowicz, Kristy Pigeon, Judy Tegart Dalton, Kerry Melville Reid, Rosemary "Rosie" Casals and Gladys Heldman, mother of Julie Heldman are the "Original Nine" founders of the women's professional circuit.

It was these nine female professional tennis players who rebelled against the United States Lawn Tennis Association (USLTA) and later set up the Virginia Slims Circuit which went on to become the WTA Tour. They revolted against the extreme inequality in the amount of prize money paid to male tennis players and to female tennis players.

Prior to the establishment of the association, male and female tennis players were treated quite differently in terms of the prize money they received.

As per reports, at the first open tournament, the 1968 British Hardcourt Championships held in Bournemouth, men's singles champion Ken Rosewall earned $2,400 while the female winner received only $720.

The situation was very similar during the second Grand Slam tournament of the open era, when male winners received more money than their female counterparts. The situation became worse in 1970 when tournaments offered four times more prize money to men than they did to women.

To end this inequality, the nine tennis players started a campaign aiming to reduce the inequality between the prize money purses for men and women.

Although the team met with many failures during their initial attempts, they were eventually allowed to set up their own tour of eight professional tournaments in 1970. This independent women's professional tennis circuit provided more equal prize money than had been provided previously by the USLTA and other organizations.

Despite the USLTA's suspension of the "Original 9" from its tournaments, by the end of the year the Virginia Slims Circuit reportedly was able to boost its numbers from nine to forty members, which helped pave the way for the first annual Virginia Slims Circuit in 1971.

Start the slideshow to catch a glimpse of some rare undated pictures of the "Original Nine" along with their recent images at the 40th Family Circle Cup tennis tournament.

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On Friday and Saturday, the 2012 NHL Draft will put more 200 of the top hockey prospects around the world into NHL hands. Some will be hits, some will be busts and some will just be pretty darn average choices.

For teams scrambling to find last-minute draft choices, maybe a look at Wednesday night's NHL Awards winners would be a start. When were all of these NHL stars selected?

Here's a look:

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