On the anniversary of the Titanic's sinking, we take a look at how things have changed in sports since then, comparing the reigning champs from 1912 in each category below to the current reigning champs in 2012. Some things have changed (the car Dan Wheldon used to win the Indy 500 is a bit different than the car that won 100 years ago), and some things are the same (youngsters seem to have a knack for winning the US Open, just ask 19-year-old Johnny McDermott and 22-year-old Rory McIlroy).

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1962 Porsche Becomes BBQ Grill

Bobby Petrino is not the first member of the sports world to experience the dangers of motorcycle riding. Many athletes, including the five below, have suffered serious injuries or even death at the handlebars of a motorcycle.

Purchasing a sports bike may seem like a reward for making it to the big time (see Charlie Sheen's character in "Major League"), but the vehicles can put careers in jeopardy -- even if you're not riding with your mistress.

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1962 Porsche Becomes BBQ Grill

Peter Hanson's tournament-low round of 65 captured the attention of the golf world Saturday, giving him a one-stroke lead after 54 holes at The Masters.

But Hanson shot a 73 in the final round Sunday to finish in a four-way tie for third place, two strokes behind Bubba Watson and Louis Oosthuizen, who went to a playoff.

If Hanson could've held on to the lead, he would have accomplished a rare feat: Following up a missed cut with a major victory.

With 61 putts in two rounds en route to falling two shots below the cut line at the Shell Houston Open last week, Hanson had the second fewest putts through three rounds on Augusta National's tricky greens.

It's pretty uncommon for someone to take home a major right after failing to qualify the previous weekend. That doesn't have to always be a negative -- a missed cut can allow extra time to size up the following week's course or work out issues on the range. But after two subpar rounds, to bounce back and prevail at a marquee tournament isn't easy. These are the last five golfers to miss the cut the week before a major triumph:

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1962 Porsche Becomes BBQ Grill

Joe Carter was up to bat.

The Blue Jays were down by a single run in the bottom of the ninth in Game 6 of the 1993 World Series, and Tony Yanow sat on his couch glued to the action with a bottle of Okanagan Spring Pale Ale.

Yanow, now the founder and co-owner of Golden Road Brewing in Los Angeles, not only remembers the ending of the game, but what he was drinking while watching it. Carter smashed a three-run, walk-off home run to give the Blue Jays back-to-back world championships.

"I was in Vancouver, thousands of kilometers from Toronto and you could hear people cheering in the street from every direction," Yanow said. "It seemed like every house erupted with excitement."

Part of his celebration was that British Columbia brew. And so it's been for fans of the sport: Beer and baseball are intertwined.

Saturday is National Beer Day, and it couldn't be more fitting that this holiday falls at the start of the MLB season (or Baseball Saison, the name of an unfiltered ale from The Brewhouse in Santa Barbara). A bottle of suds is as crucial a part of the enjoyment equation at the ballpark as peanuts and Cracker Jack. Some stadiums even have dozens of craft beer options inside, like the SandLot Brewery at Coors Field. You don't even have to be at the park to enjoy a baseball-related beer. A handful of microbreweries have tributes to America's pastime:

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It might not be good for players to have beer in the clubhouse these days (see Red Sox, Boston), but it's a necessity for fans whether they're celebrating an Albert Pujols home run or lamenting another blown save by the Nationals.

The relationship between a hot day on the diamond and a cold one in hand was best summed up by New York Times best-selling author and journalist Peter Richmond:

"Beer needs baseball, and baseball needs beer -- it has always been thus."

-- Adam Watson is the food czar at ThePostGame. You can follow him on Twitter @AdamKWatson.

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1962 Porsche Becomes BBQ Grill

In the closing moments of triumph at The Masters this Sunday, cameras will pan the gallery to find the significant others of the game's greatest golfers. There are few moments as compelling and heart-wrenching as when couples embrace after sports victories, and these men benefit greatly from the companions they've found. Here are a few of the ladies you should look out for this weekend.

Now you'll look like the smartest person watching on Sunday when you spot one of these lovely ladies before the commentators.

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So you're a serious sports fan, but you're not afraid to admit your golf knowledge could use some work. Here's a guide that puts top golfers into context with other sports to help you hold your own when everybody is waxing poetic about The Masters this week. We look at the current top ten plus some familiar faces:

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With all the talk this weekend about whether Tiger Woods can reignite his chase for Jack Nicklaus' all-time Majors record, we figured it was high time some more entertaining records be considered for discussion. So while everyone else is watching Tiger, you can root for the player tanking the worst in the first round, or for Fred Couples (you'll see why).

Maybe the Tiger intrigue is enough to keep you tuned in, but if that intrigue fades, we hope these snippets will help keep you entertained on the side.

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Played on American soil in the heart of Georgia, the Masters has come to be known as one of the United States’ premiere sporting events. That does not mean all champions have come from the homeland. There have been 12 men from nine different countries outside of the United States who have claimed green jackets.

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1962 Porsche Becomes BBQ Grill

Opening Day brings with it the promises of a new year, and more so than the Astros actually still being in the hunt, it means new food at ballparks across the country.

Each season, the chefs at MLB stadiums release menu items that they've been dreaming up over the hot stove, and this Wednesday will not disappoint. You may have already heard about the two-foot long $26 hot dog the Texas Rangers are selling. But that's just one of the many twists on the humble frank that fans can chow down on this year. Food Network, the mouth-watering television channel, is also getting into the concessions business with unique hot dogs for many stadiums this season.

More than a dozen ballparks have created signature nachos, with toppings as varied as pastrami and jerk chicken. Some represent the culture and heritage of the city and its fans. Others, like Oakland's Cholula Kalua nachos, are just going for straight flavor using Hawaiian-style pork.

But stadium chefs have also branched out beyond traditional fare, embracing more specific dietary needs for an evolving fan base. Several parks will over the Sloppy Jane, a vegan twist on the classic sandwich. The filling is a blend of tempeh, peppers, onions, molasses and brown sugar barbecue sauce on a vegan wheat bun.

No matter what you like to fuel up with to cheer your team on, there's something for everyone this year.

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-- Adam Watson is the food czar at ThePostGame. You can follow him on Twitter @AdamKWatson.

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The past three Masters champions have won with an average score of 275 (-13). Thus, it is easy to forget there have been many years where the rough, greens and creeks of Augusta National were not as kind to the field. Here are the only four men who have earned green jackets without a final score in red numbers:

Sam Snead

1954, (289/+1): Snead once said, "The three things I fear most in golf are lightning, Ben Hogan and a downhill putt." In 1954, Snead overcame the second fear to capture a seventh and final major. One year after Hogan posted a 14-under 275, Snead and Hogan grinded out four days of +1 golf. In the 18-hole playoff that ensued, Snead broke a tie on the 13th hole, downing a birdie putt, and he never looked back. His two-under 70 edged Hogan by one stroke. Snead took home the $5,000 grand prize and joined Jimmy Demaret as the only players to win three Masters. Amateur Billy Joe Patton gave both Snead and Hogan a run for their money (although Patton did not make a dime as an amateur), taking a lead into the par-5 13th hole on Sunday.

Jack Burke Jr.

1956, (289/+1): Two years later, another amateur proved he could hang with the big boys. Amateur Ken Venturi woke up Sunday with a four-stroke lead at -6. He also woke up to a rainy day with winds reaching as high as 50 mph. Venturi hit 15 greens in the final round, but three-putted six times en route to an eight-over 80. That allowed Burke, one of only two players to shoot one-under-par on Sunday (Snead was the other) to climb from +2 to +1 and take home the green jacket. The entire country was able to watch the tail end of Burke's eight-shot comeback as holes 15-18 were televised for the first time. "I thought Venturi was going to win," Burke told Sports Illustrated in 2009. "But with that wind, you could play your best and hope you didn't shoot a hundred." Burke's green jacket is one of five in his Augusta locker. The other four belong to his locker mate, Tiger Woods.

Jack Nicklaus

1966, (288/E): Gay Brewer stepped onto the 72nd tee box with a one-shot lead ahead of Jack Nicklaus and Tommy Jones. He hit the green on his second shot, but three-putted to drop out of red numbers. The following day, Nicklaus posted a 70 to edge a 72 from Jacobs. The Golden Bear became the first player to ever win two consecutive green jackets (it was his third championship overall). Brewer's blues continued Monday with a 78, dropping him to third place. Augusta was kinder to Brewer the following year. He won the 1967 Masters with an eight-under 280.

Zach Johnson

2007, (289/+1) It had been 31 years since a champion lacked red numbers, but Saturday temperatures in the mid-40s and winds reaching 33 mph pushed even the best players over par. Stuart Appleby led after 54 holes at +2, with Tiger Woods and Justin Rose trailing by just one shot. Sunday was stolen by Johnson, who started the day at +4 before birdieing three of the first six holes. He remained steady at three-under, finishing at +1 for the tournament. Woods, Retief Goosen and Rory Sabbatini put pressure on Johnson, but the trio finished tied for second at +3. Appleby mustered up a 75 to finish at +5. This Masters was the first major Woods failed to win after leading at some point in the final round.

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1962 Porsche Becomes BBQ Grill