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A rumor without Kanye West is only half as fun. On Wednesday, the web was buzzing with news that West launched a website called Whodatbiz.com as part of his tech startup Donda. Whodat.biz was supposed to be "the Facebook of websites" (come on, does that even make sense?) and essentially gives users the ability to find out about the real people behind every website out there.

Upon hearing this news, New Orleans Saints fans, and anyone who pays attention to trademark lawsuits, might have been thinking the same thing. Can West use the "Who Dat?" phrase for his site? The Saints and the NFL are currently involved in a number of trademark lawsuits over this very issue. In January of this year, Sal and Steve Monistere of Who Dat?, Inc. reached a settlement with the NFL to allow merchandise with the catch phrase to be co-branded by both parties. After the Saints' Super Bowl win, New Orleans vendors went on a "Who Dat?" spree, inciting the NFL to send cease and desist letters faster than a tourist can buy a tacky T-shirt on Canal St.

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Are you excited about the Final Four, but left out in the cold without a team to root for since your beloved squad got bumped? We went ahead and weighed the benefits and downsides to rooting for each of the teams left.

Kansas (31-6) Midwest No. 2 Seed

Road to the Final Four
Remember how the Jayhawks were supposed to get upset by a double-digit seed before they reached the final four? Somehow, that didn't happen like it always does. Three of those teams had a shot: No. 15 Detroit hung around for a while, No. 10 Purdue had the best shot but bungled it away in the final minute, and No. 11 NC State couldn't make the shots to hang on. Then a neutered No. 1 North Carolina got blown away in the second half of the regional final without Kendall Marshall. There is Dr. Jekyll Kansas and there is Mr. Hyde Kansas. The former has a thing for letting Cinderellas walk all over it, the latter plays with an inherent ownership of the game.

History
Like you don't already know. And if you don't, don't worry, a Jayhawk fan will be happy enlighten you on the virtues of Kansas basketball. Dr. James Naismith, Phog Allen, Wilt Chamberlain -- Jayhawks invented the game, and they believe this is their birthright.

Underdog status/Will they get back to the Final Four soon?
That depends on if Bucknell, Bradley, Northern Iowa or VCU make the tournament. Sorry, that was shameless and too easy. The reality: the Jayhawks always have better than a puncher's chance in March. This won't be their last national semifinal.

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Everyone knows that Tim Duncan is much closer to his retirement than his prime, but the official boxscore from the Spurs-76ers game Sunday night re-iterated this point in an innovative way.

The Spurs were playing their third game in three nights, so coach Gregg Popovich gave the 35-year-old Duncan a rest. The stat crew in San Antonio decided to have some fun with this. Check out the reason why Duncan was listed as a DNP (Did Not Play):

The boxscore was distributed by the Associated Press, and more than one national outlet, including NBA.com, published this creative designation for Duncan's absence.

Despite not playing, Duncan still showed up in another spot within the boxscore. Referee Joey Crawford slapped Duncan, who was sitting on the Spurs bench, with a technical foul late in the game for arguing.

Based on that, it'd be tempting to call Duncan a grumpy old man, but that label might be better suited for Crawford, who was suspended in 2007 after he ejected Duncan from a game for laughing.

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There are no real rules on retiring numbers. It’s a formality, a sign of respect; when a number is retired, it shows that the organization views the wearer of that jersey in a dignified, honored manner. In fact, there is only one real rule when it comes to retiring jersey numbers: no one is allowed to wear that number for that team ever again.

Unless your name is Peyton Manning, of course.

During his announcement on Tuesday afternoon, Peyton Manning flashed a big smile as he held up the orange jersey, freshly pressed with “Manning” on the back and the number 18 stretched across it. He spoke with grace and dignity about Frank Tripucka, the original owner of the Broncos No. 18 jersey. He said all the right things.

“I had the privilege of speaking with Frank Tripucka this morning,” Manning said at the press conference. “It really goes against everything I believe in being a guy who appreciates the history of football and I believe when a number is retired it should stay retired; but in talking to Frank Tripucka, I feel he really wants me to wear his number.  It was a very humbling conversation and I am honored to wear his number.”

He wasn’t the only one saying the right things on the subject. Tripucka, a man most football fans did not know until this week, is quoted in an article from First-and-Orange, a Denver Broncos fan blog, as saying that he would be “honored” if Manning wore his jersey number. Both Manning and Tripucka are fine with unretiring the number. And if there were a right way to go about this process, they would be successfully doing so.

Unfortunately, there isn’t.

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March is both a house of horrors and a Shangri-La for Kansas Jayhawk basketball. Multiple national titles give Jayhawk fans plenty to boast about to college hoops fans everywhere, while even more upset exits from March Madness provide endless return volleys from critics.

Make no mistake: When the Jayhawks are national champions, the game comes full circle to its roots at the university with names like Naismith, Allen and Chamberlain. And the program's reputation always precedes it as one of the most elite basketball programs in the nation. Eight straight Big 12 titles, some of the nation's best recruits, and numerous deep runs (including the 2008 championship) cements KU into every preseason Top 10 list.

But when things are bad, there aren't enough rags in the state to get the egg off the faces of the coaches, players, fans and the buses they hightailed out of town on. Naturally, every KU fan hears the same question at the beginning of every season. "Which double-digit seed are you guys going to lose to this March?" Previous embarassing early exits to Bradley (13), Bucknell (14), Northern Iowa (9) and VCU (11) set the ground work for that question. Small school folk heroes like Ali Farokhmanesh, Shaka Smart, Marcellus Sommerville and Chris McNaughton will live forever as their campuses' Davids to Kansas' Goliath, and as infamous upstart villains in Lawrence, Kan.

But this year, things are different. Here's why Kansas won't lose to (11) NC State on Friday night in St. Louis:

Thomas Robinson and Jeff Withey
Robinson is THE man for KU. He averaged 17 points and 11 boards for the Jayhawks this season. He is a sure-fire First Team All-American and has a strong chance to be named Player of the Year. He is an absolute force in the paint. He can also step back and hit some deep jumpers when needed. The one fault that he has is that he isn't the strongest shot blocker, averaging just under one per game. That's where Withey steps in and picks up the slack. He averaged 3.3 blocks per game, which was good for seventh in the nation. The two players complement each other well, with each knowing how to accentuate the strengths of the other.

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There's a lot of chatter about the imminent quarterback change in Denver, and nowhere is that chatter more relevant than in the team's locker room. Here were a few things "overheard" in the Broncos' locker room yesterday.

10. I don't care if he has memorized the playbook, does he know the Old Testament?

9. He wants to do what now? A forward pass? That's sounds so crazy it just might work!

8. Can we keep Tebow to harvest body parts for Peyton?

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The crew from the Dan Wetzel Podcast has assembled to provide you up-to-the-minute analysis and predictions of the 2012 NCAA basketball tournament.

Stick with us during the tournament as Veronica Morningstone, the fake Twitter account of former Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe, and "superfan" Michael Rudolph deliver their unique perspectives on college athletics. Alcohol and romance are likely to also fill the air.

Written by: @DanWetzel, @DanBeebe and @MRudolphComedy.

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The crew from the Dan Wetzel Podcast has assembled to provide you up-to-the-minute analysis and predictions of the 2012 NCAA basketball tournament.

Stick with us during the tournament as Veronica Morningstone, the fake Twitter account of former Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe, and "superfan" Michael Rudolph deliver their unique perspectives on college athletics. Alcohol and romance are likely to also fill the air.

Written by: @DanWetzel, @DanBeebe and @MRudolphComedy.

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The crew from the Dan Wetzel Podcast has assembled to provide you up-to-the-minute analysis and predictions of the 2012 NCAA basketball tournament.

Stick with us throughout Thursday and Friday as Veronica Morningstone, the fake Twitter account of former Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe, and "superfan" Michael Rudolph deliver their unique perspectives on college athletics. Alcohol and romance are likely to also fill the air.

Written by: @DanWetzel, @DanBeebe and @MRudolphComedy.

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ORLANDO, Fla. -- The basketball world snickered when Dwight Howard bragged Thursday about being "too loyal." Eyes rolled when the Magic All-Star center talked about fasting and turning down his favorite candies during tense contract talks. And surely eyebrows were raised when the self-titled Superman asked everyone to "believe" in Orlando now that he's staying around another year.

But all the skepticism and scorn at Howard's self-pity and script-flipping proves one thing:

He made the right decision.

Dwight Howard belongs in Orlando -- a one-franchise, one-newspaper town where he can say whatever he wants and then go play video games and everyone will love him anyway. Howard is both a fully-formed superstar and an incomplete project -- imposing and still immature -- but Orlando built him a palace and begged him to stay.

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