Leash laws are put in place for a reason. Many dog owners tend to think that it's no big deal if their dog is leashed. After all, Rover has such a pleasant demeanor, he'll never be aggressive toward other dogs. And you know what, they could be right.

But as Benton (or Fenton?) shows in this video, even the most good-natured canine can get into a heap of trouble when it's off the leash. Not only causing the rare park stampede, but also threatening a major traffic mishap.

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While the dog's owner's beleaguered and exasperated chase is what makes the video wildly amusing and relatable for every dog owner who's had a dog that was tough to corral, it's also a sort of cautionary tale. Leash up your dog before it wreaks havoc on the park and your sense of shame.

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Dogs, Outdoors

The Internet is littered with thousands of videos of dogs and their cute tricks. Lily the terrier puts all of those children to shame. She's a grown dog with no interest in silly flips for treats. She shreds on the mountain bike trail right behind her owner. And as you'll see, she's all business -- with a staggering combination of speed and hops.

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The most ridiculous part of the video is that on a number of occasions, Lily catches up with the bike, and not because the bike stopped, or even slowed all that much. Pump the brakes once? Lily has you run down. What a freakishly impressive ability to haul (literal) tail.

Roll over? Bow? Play dead? The perfect tricks for your dog to perform as Lily flies by.

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Jub Jub the St. Bernard has a small cult following on YouTube (he recently balanced a lacrosse stick on his nose to the tune of over 230,000 views), but the canine's latest challenge is a bit more multifaceted.

The monstrous mutt takes on a boy named Nate in a little game of one-on-one football, and, aided by an epic soundtrack, the match-up is about as even as they come.

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We're not sure what's more entertaining, the football showdown, or Nate's attempt to walk Jub Jub at the end of the video. And who would win an actual football game between 11 Jub Jubs and 11 boys just like Nate? You may think the answer is obviously the boys, and you'd have an entirely valid argument. After all, there would likely be untold procedure and alignment penalties committed by the dog. But they seem like a bunch that could swarm to the ball in numbers.

Quick, someone make this happen!

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University of Colorado students and fans are resting easier Tuesday, knowing their beloved mascot is alive and well.

For a short time Sunday, the Daily Camera reports, police in Boulder, Colo., were concerned that Ralphie the Buffalo had been killed. Two Colorado students returned home late at night Saturday to find a massive buffalo head leaning against a large rock in front of their house. Patrick Burke originally thought it was fake, but after picking it up and seeing blood drip out, he realized this was no prop. The students panicked, thinking their iconic mascot was killed by a rival school.

The students called police, who immediately contacted the school. CU officials checked and both living mascots were safe and sound.

By Monday afternoon, law enforcement had solved the tale of the beheaded buffalo. A third resident of the house where the animal head was found called cops after seeing TV news reports about the incident. He told authorities he received the head as a souvenir following a visit to a family friend's buffalo ranch in Nebraska. Turned out it was the head of a buffalo slaughtered as part of a routine culling of the herd. The third roommate was drying it in his backyard so he could eventually display it in his home.

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The live mascot tradition began in Boulder back in 1934. While most mistake Ralphie for a male, she's not. Colorado uses female bison for insurance purposes, since the ladies are smaller and less aggressive than their male counterparts. It's said Ralphie can run as fast as 25 miles per hour.

Ted Turner, the CNN patriarch, donated the current mascot, Ralphie V, from one of his ranches. Turner, who used to own the Atlanta Braves, is the second largest individual landholder in North America with an estimated two million acres of land.

Police took the buffalo head back to the station as evidence, but it is expected to be returned to its rightful owner on Wednesday.

Denver's CBS 4 reports:

Ralphie's rip-roaring video:

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Behold the coolest Go Pro video yet. Oh sure, there have been impressive angles from snowboards and racecars and skydivers. But few have been as hypnotic and as interesting as this one, mounted to the stick in a retriever's mouth.

Granted, if you get dizzy from watching motion-crazy films, perhaps it's not for you. But the perspective is pretty awesome, dog.

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The video is sort of surreal, recording the stillness of a moment that if witnessed from any other perspective, would seem frantic, frenetic and exciting. Playing with your dog in the backyard on a snowy day just got a whole lot cooler -- even after the moment has passed.

Just try not to toss the stick into the lake.

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Animals, Dogs

Flipper may be the only dolphin on the Hollywood A-list, but can he claim a namesake inspired by a Super Bowl MVP? No, that honor belongs to a dolphin named Roux Brees.

According to WWL-TV in New Orleans, the dolphin washed up on the shores of Grand Isle in January. Nearly 350 stranded marine mammals have died in the Gulf of Mexico this year -- a phenomenon the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is calling an "unusual mortality event." (Researchers have found an unusual bacteria in many of the deceased animals, but they haven't determined whether it's connected to the BP oil spill.) But this dolphin lived.

Caretakers at the Audubon Institute in New Orleans watched as the dolphin showed strength in the face of adversity, like a certain quarterback who took a formerly ridiculed NFL team to the Super Bowl, and decided to name him Roux Brees. He is one of only two beached dolphins to have survived the strange "mortality event," says Dr. Robert MacLean, senior veterinarian at the Audubon Institute.

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For five months, Roux received rehab worthy of a celebrity athlete. Veterinarians and technicians worked around the clock to teach him how to swim again. With a resilience and spirit known to New Orleanians, he became healthy enough to be moved to a permanent home at Gulf World Marine Park in Panama City Beach, Fla. The park serves as a rescue and educational facility.

"He seems to have made a full recovery and we anticipate a normal lifespan into his 30s or 40s," says Dr. MacLean. "He will remain in captivity."

Drew Brees, a supporter of the Audubon Institute, told WWL he thinks it's "pretty cool" to have this special dolphin named after him. We're pretty sure Roux is happy too. If Brees had become a Miami Dolphin in 2006, Roux might not have such a cool name.

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Almost nothing in sports is as dreaded as the death of a horse. Every time a stallion or thoroughbred falters in a competition, breath is held and terrifying memories come to mind.

On Sunday, the worst came to pass. Hickstead, one of the world's most beloved horses, collapsed at a show-jumping tournament in Italy.

Hickstead was a superhorse, carrying Canadian show-jumper Eric Lamaze to equestrian gold in the 2008 Olympic Games. He was 15 years old and still at the top of his game, completing a run at the Rolex FEI World Cup Sunday before trotting away from a 13-jump course which he finished almost flawlessly.

Then, in front of a gallery of fans, Hickstead gave way under Lamaze.

"We finished our round, I circled and was leaving the ring, and he collapsed and died," Lamaze said in a statement. "It is the most tragic thing that has ever happened. We had him until he was 15, and we had a great time together. He was the best horse in the world. We are all devastated."

The horrified crowd had to witness the horse lying on the ground in pain, hooves flailing in the air. There is video on the Internet, as always, but there's no need to show it here. There's no need to watch the death of the best equestrian horse in the world. Instead, here are Hickstead and Lamaze at their best, in the World Equestrian Games last year:

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There are no necropsy results yet, but experts say Hickstead likely had a massive coronary.

"The horse is a natural blood doper," Karyn Malinowski, the director of the Equine Science Center at Rutgers University in New Jersey, told the New York Times. "When the horse does an athletic event, it will automatically dump tons of red blood cells into the bloodstream. It's what makes the horse a fabulous athlete. And at the same time, because you have an increase, the blood does become thicker, and if the horse was prone to a weakened heart, it could have burst."

The stronger the horse, the more fragile he or she is. A stallion's legs don't grow to match its enormous girth, which makes every race and every leap a miracle and a risk. Whether it's Ruffian, Barbaro or Hickstead, the most unforgettable horses in history are made legendary because they ran to their limits, and couldn't run past them.

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